Ministry and Leadership Program

Master of Divinity

Objectives and Outcomes

Shiloh University’s Master of Divinity degree provides professional and theological graduate training designed to equip the participant for the continued study, application, and ministering of God’s Word. The curriculum concentrates on the biblical basis for ministry practices, allowing for ministry formation in concert with the participant’s home church beliefs, and making room for the Holy Spirit to teach and minister in the participant’s life. Additional emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skills necessary to lead, teach, or minister in a church or parachurch setting.

Program Road Map

Admissions

Tuition

About Us

The Master of Divinity degree is a first professional degree focused on providing a balance of biblical, theological, and ministerial disciplines for the training and equipping of Christian ministries. It is regarded as a preparatory degree for professional ministry leadership and a prerequisite degree for Doctor of Ministry programs.

Emphasis

Master of Divinity - Traditional Track

Admission Requirements

Master of Divinity

Accredited Degree Program

  • At least a bachelor’s degree or educational equivalent from an accredited school (a master’s degree from an accredited school will substitute for a bachelor’s degree)
  • Grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 on undergraduate work
  • Applicants who are not native English language speakers must demonstrate English proficiency

Required Application Documents 

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Completed application form (including an applicable resume or CV)
  • Official college transcripts
  • A personal essay
  • Two recommendation forms:
    • One recommendation from an overseeing pastor, board member, or similar position
    • One recommendation from a peer
  • A copy of a government-issued photo identification card

Personal and Professional Development

Personal enrichment students may take classes on a credit/no-credit basis. Courses taken may not be applied to a degree program.

Prerequisites:

  • No scholastic prerequisites 
  • Must be at least 18 years old

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Completed application form 
  • Personal Statement (on the application form)

Transcript Evaluation for Foreign Students

Students whose previous education did not take place in the United States will need to work with the WES (World Education Services) to have their educational experience evaluated. For information on the evaluation process refer to the World Education Services website.

Tuition

Master of Divinity: (Total Program Cost)

Tuition ($375 x 72 credits)

$

27,000

Textbook costs ($100 per course estimate) *

$

2,400

Program total cost

$

29,400

*Students may purchase textbooks from the vendor of their choice. Therefore, the cost listed above is only the best estimate.

The program length is 4 years. Students can choose the following payment method:

  1. Pay annually, will enjoy a 3% tuition deduction
  2. Pay monthly, there will be an additional 3% processing fee

Program Goals

The Master of Divinity degree program is designed to:

  • Provide a biblical, theological, historical, practical, and personal foundation for ministry from a Spirit-filled perspective.
  • Develop research and analytical skills at the graduate level necessary for the ministry and for ongoing biblical studies.
  • Foster the integration of biblical, theological, and ministry skills.
  • Develop interpersonal communication skills necessary for the ministry.
  • Develop a commitment to lifelong learning, growth, and ministry.

Traditional Track Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Master of Divinity program, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the authorship, literary and historical background, structure, and themes of the books of the Bible.
  • Apply the study of church history and theology to the practice of ministry.
  • Perform graduate-level research and writing.
  • Demonstrate the ability to interpret and properly apply biblical texts using sound hermeneutical principles and exegetical methods.
  • Communicate Scripture and theology with clarity and conviction.
  • Demonstrate competency in Christian ministry.
  • Exhibit the character of a teachable, servant-oriented leader.
  • Serve in a pastoral or other ministry role, and teach in a church, church institute, or Bible college.

Ministry Experience

Practical ministry experience and personal devotion are vital elements of an effective ministry program. As a first professional degree, the Master of Divinity degree requires students to document 400 hours of ministry experience, 300 hours in supervised ministry during the first two years of study and 100 hours of close mentoring as part of their final Mentored Ministry course. Students may complete these requirements at a location of their choice.

Course List

Biblical Studies (29 units)

BL 501 / 502 – Biblical Hebrew (8 units) OR

An introductory course to Biblical Hebrew. Students will gain a basic understanding of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. The course focuses on learning and pronouncing the alphabet, vowels, different parts of speech, nouns and verb inflectional forms, and building vocabulary. It provides the necessary
foundation for developing skills needed to read, understand, and interpret Classical Hebrew Scriptures. Having the ability to read the Hebrew Bible will enhance knowledge of Hebraic culture, reinforce and further knowledge of other religious disciplines, increase knowledge of student’s own language, enhance personal devotion, serve as a useful tool for the study of other Hebraic texts, and allow for an informed and powerful teaching and preaching ministry.

Biblical Hebrew 2 is a continuation of the introduction to Biblical Hebrew 1. The second level launches the student into a solid reading and understanding of elementary Biblical Hebrew. It empowers the learner to read and translate simple Hebrew Scriptures. The course will enhance and deepen the knowledge gained in the first course, increasing both the vocabulary and the understanding of grammar, morphology, and syntax. Emphasis is given to building new vocabulary and learning new noun and verb inflectional forms in the remaining Hebrew stems. Additional elements of Hebrew grammar are studied through reading Scriptures, writing short sentences, and speaking exercises. The course provides additional necessary foundations for developing the skills needed to read and
translate the Hebrew Bible, enhance personal devotion, and allow for stronger and effective teaching and preaching ministry.

           BL 503 / 504 – Biblical Greek (8 units)

The goal of Greek 1 and 2 is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2-trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

The goal of Greek 1 and 2 is to equip students with a basic working knowledge of Koine Greek. An understanding of Biblical Greek will be a valuable tool in your personal study of God’s word in your ministry. The course will present an introduction to Koine Greek, with an emphasis on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary as used in the New Testament. Introduction to Biblical Greek is a 2-trimester course. Both trimesters are required to be taken consecutively.

MT 505 – Introduction to Biblical Interpretation

Introduction to Biblical Interpretation provides an overview of the historical and cultural background and the literary genres of the Bible as a foundation for the study of Scripture. The student will study the integration of history, literature, and theology to ensure a proper interpretation of the Bible. The student will gain insights into the various genres of Old and New Testament literature and the best
guidelines to interpret each type. This course will explore various applications of these truths.

MT 507 – Biblical Hermeneutics    

Biblical Hermeneutics is the study of the process of interpreting the Bible. The student will study and practice the use of historical context, cultural context, literary context, and biblical context, as well as the role of original languages in the interpretation of the Bible. The student will also be introduced to the history of biblical hermeneutics and other contemporary approaches to the subject.

NT 501 – Introduction to the New Testament

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. Our purpose is to come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New Testament. In addition, woven into the class is our study of important background issues (authorship, dating, etc.), theological themes, and methodologies and applications of each book’s concepts to the 21st century.

OT 501 – Introduction to the Old Testament

Introduction to the Old Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the Old Testament documents. The purpose of this course is to help the student interact with the message of the Old Testament as a basis for personal growth and to give the student the ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the
books of the Old Testament. Woven into the class are a study of important background issues and theological themes. These include the role of archeology in the study of the Old Testament, the geographical importance of the land of Israel, the role of covenant in the story of the nation of Israel, and the preparation of the world for the coming of Jesus the King.

OT 502 – Historical Geography of Israel

In Historical Geography of Israel, the students will learn about the geographic regions of Israel and how the geography affected the lives of peoples who lived there in biblical times. The student will study the context of the surrounding regions and civilizations that played a huge role in the history of the Promised Land. There will also be an opportunity to apply historical and geographical information to selected biblical texts and stories.

NT 504 – The Gospels / The Life of Christ

The Gospels / The Life of Christ introduces the graduate student to the four canonical Gospels as well as to the historical Jesus. The course materials include substantial attention to significant arguments, theories, and paradigms of Gospel scholarship.

NT 513 – Jewish Background of the Parables

Jewish Background of the Parables offers an in-depth study of the parables of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels and early non-canonical literature from a Jewish literary and historical perspective. It compares and contrasts parallel Jewish parables from the Hebrew Bible and Rabbinical Literature with the parables Jesus used in his ministry. This course also surveys different methods of interpretation of the parables in the New Testament. Then a free model, which draws on the best insights of each method, is applied to each parable in the Gospels. Conclusions are drawn concerning the theology and significance of Jesus’s teaching with consideration given to the present-day application.

Church History and Theology (15 units)

CH 501 – Survey of Church History

Survey of Church History surveys the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to the present. The student will learn about the key persons, issues, and events of each age of the church; discover the impact these persons and events had on each other, and identify their impact on the church of today. In addition, the student will examine the influence of the Holy Spirit in the history
of the Christian Church.

CH 504 – Spiritual Outpourings and Revival

Spiritual Outpourings and Revival gives students an overview of the spiritual outpourings and revivals in North America and the world during the 20th century. The course traces three of the major revivals of the past century. The student will learn about the background, people, places, and events that surrounded these revivals and discover the continuing impact of these revivals on Christianity. This course uses the study of the past to provide a foundation for the present.

JS 503 – Jewish Foundations of Christianity

Jewish Foundations of Christianity graduate-level course examines an unexplored, misunderstood, yet vital subject. Christian roots are deeply rooted in the Hebrew Scriptures, as well as the religion, culture, and history of the Jewish people. The course seeks to enhance participants’ understanding of the emergence, development and spread of Christianity from Judaism. Explore the complex relationship between the two religions, major traditional Jewish themes, and theologies that influenced the religious life of the early church. The class explores the history of Judaism during the Second Temple period, the Abrahamic covenant, and its relation to the New Testament and the early church. In
addition, major ideological conflicts of Jesus, his disciples, and the early church with religious Jewish leaders, the faith and life of the first Messianic Jews, and religious celebrations preserved by the church will also be discussed.

TH 501 – Theology 1

Theology 1 introduces students to theological thinking that begins in the life of God, is witnessed to in the Bible, and articulated in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as sent from His Father. We will discuss the nature of humanity created in God’s image but afflicted with sin and needing God’s restorative work. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed to in the Bible and
made evident in the revelation of Jesus Christ, as well as to discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the church and world.

TH 502 – Theology 2

Theology 2 continues the task of theological thinking that begins in the life of God. We will explore the person and work of the Holy Spirit, the place of Scripture in theological thinking, the life of the Christian in response to God, the life of the church, and the direction in which the Triune God is moving history. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed in the Bible to
discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the Christian Church and the world.

Theology Research Skills (3 units)

GS 501 – Theological Research and Writing

Theological Research and Writing will prepare students for research and writing requirements of future Shiloh University course work. This course will equip students with biblical and theological resources and will teach them how to utilize online tools for cataloging these resources. The students will learn various types and approaches to biblical and theological research; they will also learn how to write a research paper. The course includes a review of basic grammar in preparation for writing research papers, for future studies in the biblical languages, and for the process of biblical exegesis.

Ministry Practices (27 units)

MM 501 – Mentored Ministry

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage, and evaluate their activities as they minister in real-life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the university and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practice studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The student will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies. The reports and papers submitted appropriately reflect the graduate level of this course.

MT 501 – Spiritual Formation

Spiritual Formation presents a study of various spiritual disciplines that help foster the spiritual formation of a Christian believer. Each discipline will be studied through the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbook by Richard Foster, Celebration of Discipline, and additional readings that provide a strong foundation for spiritual formation. While the disciplines in themselves are not an end result, they can facilitate an exposure to God that brings transformation and spiritual maturity.

MT 506 – Homiletics

Homiletics is a course designed to teach the principles of developing and delivering anointed expository sermons. The practical goal of this course is to familiarize students with the principles involved in each step of developing and delivering an expository message; from prayerfully looking to the Holy Spirit for the initial selection of a text, through the development of the main idea, preparing an outline and draft of the sermon, to the oral delivery of the message God is giving.

MT 509 – Missions and Evangelism

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern-day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the
life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

MT 511 – Principles of Spiritual Care

Principles of Spiritual Care provides a biblical Trinitarian foundation for Christian counseling and ministry. It explores the “why” behind the “what” and “how.” This course will explore how the understanding of God as a “being in relations” impacts spiritual care and ministry. This course will develop a theological basis for spiritual care.

MT 512 – Biblical Curriculum Development

Biblical Curriculum Development guides the student in planning a series of Bible studies and sermons. The student will study principles of effective teaching, including planning, preparation, and presentation. The course will present opportunities to prepare inductive and deductive study outlines. The student will learn how to identify the “big idea” of an individual study or series of lessons, and
how to develop content around that idea. For a series of lessons or sermons, the student will identify the topic, goal, objectives, and lesson outlines.

PL 501 – Foundations of Liturgy

Foundations of Liturgy will cover the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will proceed to analyze the basic
elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students will be coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from selected practitioners.

PL 505 – Relational Church Planting and Growth

Relational Church Planting and Growth examines the dynamics of church planting, development, and growth from a relational model which honors the biblical/theological foundations of the apostolic Church while learning to exegete the congregation, community, and culture in the context of the Lord’s kingdom mandate. Attention is given to relational-missional approaches of developing, sending, and serving which may assist in improving multi-generational connections between the life of the Church and its changing context.

PL 510 – Stewardship and Administration

Stewardship and Administration will guide the student through an analysis of the qualities of an effective leader and the requirement of faithful stewardship in the church. Topics covered in this course include leadership, delegation, administration, stewardship, church finances, church records, and risk
management.

Total for the program – 74 Units

All courses are 3 units except as otherwise noted.

Units Needed

The Master of Divinity degree is a four-year program consisting of 74 units.

Graduation Requirements

To graduate with the Master of Divinity degree the student will:

  • Complete the minimum number of units required.
  • Successfully complete all courses in the degree program.
  • Earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
  • Fulfill any outstanding school financial obligations.
Emphasis

Master of Divinity - Care of Souls Track

The Master of Divinity care of souls track will provide the broad-based biblical, theological, and pastoral training for students who are called to a ministry of assisting those facing difficult life challenges. Students are encouraged to participate in and apply Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) toward their degree program requirements. The care of souls track will equip students to make an immediate impact.

Admission Requirements

Master of Divinity

Accredited Degree Program

  • At least a bachelor’s degree or educational equivalent from an accredited school (a master’s degree from an accredited school will substitute for a bachelor’s degree)
  • Grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 on undergraduate work
  • Applicants who are not native English language speakers must demonstrate English proficiency

Required Application Documents 

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Completed application form (including an applicable resume or CV)
  • Official college transcripts
  • A personal essay
  • Two recommendation forms:
    • One recommendation from an overseeing pastor, board member, or similar position
    • One recommendation from a peer
  • A copy of a government-issued photo identification card

Personal and Professional Development

Personal enrichment students may take classes on a credit/no-credit basis. Courses taken may not be applied to a degree program.

Prerequisites:

  • No scholastic prerequisites 
  • Must be at least 18 years old

Applicants must submit the following:

  • Completed application form 
  • Personal Statement (on the application form)

Transcript Evaluation for Foreign Students

Students whose previous education did not take place in the United States will need to work with the WES (World Education Services) to have their educational experience evaluated. For information on the evaluation process refer to the World Education Services website.

Tuition

Master of Divinity: (Total Program Cost)

Tuition ($375 x 72 credits)

$

27,000

Textbook costs ($100 per course estimate) *

$

2,400

Program total cost

$

29,400

*Students may purchase textbooks from the vendor of their choice. Therefore, the cost listed above is only the best estimate.

The program length is 4 years. Students can choose the following payment method:

  1. Pay annually, will enjoy a 3% tuition deduction
  2. Pay monthly, there will be an additional 3% processing fee

Program Goals

The Master of Divinity degree program is designed to:

  • Provide a foundation for pastoral care and chaplaincy work.
  • Develop research and analytical skills at the graduate level necessary for the the ongoing practice of ministry.
  • Foster the integration of biblical, theological, and ministry skills.
  • Develop interpersonal communication skills necessary for the ministry.
  • Develop a commitment to lifelong learning, growth, and ministry.

Care of Souls Track Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Master of Divinity program, you will be able to:

  • Integrate the foundations of biblical study, church history, and theology to the practice of ministry.
  • Apply the principles of pastoral care, biblical counseling, and crisis counseling to various ministry settings.
  • Perform graduate-level research and writing.
  • Exhibit the character of Christ in caring for those needing pastoral or chaplaincy care.
  • Serve in a pastoral or chaplaincy role, and teach in a church, church institute, or Bible college.

Ministry Experience

Practical ministry experience and personal devotion are vital elements of an effective ministry program. As a first professional degree, the Master of Divinity degree requires students to document 400 hours of ministry experience, 300 hours in supervised ministry during the first two years of study and 100 hours of close mentoring as part of their final Mentored Ministry course. Students may complete these requirements at a location of their choice.

Chaplaincy Education Credit

Students looking to become a board-certified chaplain can combine Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) with Shiloh University’s Master of Divinity program to streamline chaplaincy career preparation.

  • For CPE completed prior to enrolling in the Master of Divinity program the University may accept up to two CPE credits toward program requirements including the 300 hour Supervised Ministry requirement and three units of elective credit. CPE credit applied toward these requirements must be no more than three years old and ten years old respectively.
  • For CPE credits taken while enrolled in the Master of Divinity program the University may accept up to three CPE credits toward program requirements including the 300 hour Supervised Ministry requirement, Mentored Ministry course and three units of elective credit.

While prior-earned CPE credit and concurrently-earned CPE are both considered, no more than three CPE credits will be considered for transfer. Acceptance of CPE credit is subject to the University’s transfer credit policy.

Course List

Biblical Studies (15 units)

MT 505 – Introduction to Biblical Interpretation

Introduction to Biblical Interpretation provides an overview of the historical and cultural background and the literary genres of the Bible as a foundation for the study of Scripture. The student will study the integration of history, literature, and theology to ensure a proper interpretation of the Bible. The student will gain insights into the various genres of Old and New Testament literature and the best
guidelines to interpret each type. This course will explore various applications of these truths.

NT 501 – Introduction to the New Testament

Introduction to the New Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the New Testament documents. Our purpose is to come to an understanding of the message of the New Testament that will provide a basis for personal growth and an ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the New
Testament. In addition, woven into the class is our study of important background issues (authorship, dating, etc.), theological themes, and methodologies and applications of each book’s concepts to the 21st century.

OT 501 – Introduction to the Old Testament

Introduction to the Old Testament is a study of the background, content, and basic themes presented in the Old Testament documents. The purpose of this course is to help the student interact with the message of the Old Testament as a basis for personal growth and to give the student the ability to explain the Scriptures to others. We will become familiar with the main themes of each of the books of the Old Testament. Woven into the class are a study of important background issues and theological themes. These include the role of archeology in the study of the Old Testament, the geographical importance of the land of Israel, the role of covenant in the story of the nation of Israel, and the preparation of the world for the coming of Jesus the King.

NT 504 – The Gospels / The Life of Christ

The Gospels / The Life of Christ introduces the graduate student to the four canonical Gospels as well as to the historical Jesus. The course materials include substantial attention to significant arguments, theories, and paradigms of Gospel scholarship.

NT 513 – Jewish Background of the Parables

Jewish Background of the Parables offers an in-depth study of the parables of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels and early non-canonical literature from a Jewish literary and historical perspective. It compares and contrasts parallel Jewish parables from the Hebrew Bible and Rabbinical Literature with the parables Jesus used in his ministry. This course also surveys different methods of interpretation of the parables in the New Testament. Then a free model, which draws on the best insights of each method, is applied to each parable in the Gospels. Conclusions are drawn concerning the theology and significance of Jesus’s teaching with consideration given to the present-day application.

Church History and Theology (15 units)

CH 501 – Survey of Church History

Survey of Church History surveys the history of the Christian Church from the Apostolic Age to the present. The student will learn about the key persons, issues, and events of each age of the church; discover the impact these persons and events had on each other, and identify their impact on the church of today. In addition, the student will examine the influence of the Holy Spirit in the history
of the Christian Church.

CH 504 – Spiritual Outpourings and Revival

Spiritual Outpourings and Revival gives students an overview of the spiritual outpourings and revivals in North America and the world during the 20th century. The course traces three of the major revivals of the past century. The student will learn about the background, people, places, and events that
surrounded these revivals and discover the continuing impact of these revivals on Christianity. This course uses the study of the past to provide a foundation for the present.

JS 503 – Jewish Foundations of Christianity

Jewish Foundations of Christianity graduate-level course examines an unexplored, misunderstood, yet vital subject. Christian roots are deeply rooted in the Hebrew Scriptures, as well as the religion, culture, and history of the Jewish people. The course seeks to enhance participants’ understanding of the
emergence, development and spread of Christianity from Judaism. Explore the complex relationship between the two religions, major traditional Jewish themes, and theologies that influenced the religious life of the early church. The class explores the history of Judaism during the Second Temple period, the Abrahamic covenant, and its relation to the New Testament and the early church. In
addition, major ideological conflicts of Jesus, his disciples, and the early church with religious Jewish leaders, the faith and life of the first Messianic Jews, and religious celebrations preserved by the church will also be discussed.

TH 501 – Theology 1

Theology 1 introduces students to theological thinking that begins in the life of God, is witnessed to in the Bible, and articulated in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ as sent from His Father. We will discuss the nature of humanity created in God’s image but afflicted with sin and needing God’s restorative work. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed to in the Bible and
made evident in the revelation of Jesus Christ, as well as to discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the church and world.

TH 502 – Theology 2

Theology 2 continues the task of theological thinking that begins in the life of God. We will explore the person and work of the Holy Spirit, the place of Scripture in theological thinking, the life of the Christian in response to God, the life of the church, and the direction in which the Triune God is moving history. The student will learn to think out of the life of God witnessed in the Bible to discern inadequate presentations, all in order to serve God in the life of the Christian Church and the world.

Theology Research Skills (3 units)

GS 501 – Theological Research and Writing

Theological Research and Writing will prepare students for research and writing requirements of future Shiloh University course work. This course will equip students with biblical and theological resources and will teach them how to utilize online tools for cataloging these resources. The students will learn various types and approaches to biblical and theological research; they will also learn how to write a research paper. The course includes a review of basic grammar in preparation for writing research papers, for future studies in the biblical languages, and for the process of biblical exegesis.

Ministry Practices (39 units)

MM 501 – Mentored Ministry

The Mentored Ministry course provides an apprenticeship experience for students to serve in a focused area of ministry. They will interact with a mentor who will direct, encourage, and evaluate their activities as they minister in real-life situations. This training allows for students to apply what they have learned at the university and to draw on the principles taught in their biblical, theological, and ministry practice studies. The students will explore and write about the practice of mentoring in the Scriptures. The student will also write a paper that reflects on their mentoring experience, and on what they have learned in their studies. The reports and papers submitted appropriately reflect the graduate level of this course.

MT 501 – Spiritual Formation

Spiritual Formation presents a study of various spiritual disciplines that help foster the spiritual formation of a Christian believer. Each discipline will be studied through the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbook by Richard Foster, Celebration of Discipline, and additional readings that provide a strong foundation for spiritual formation. While the disciplines in themselves are not an end result, they can facilitate an exposure to God that brings transformation and spiritual maturity.

MT 506 – Homiletics

Homiletics is a course designed to teach the principles of developing and delivering anointed expository sermons. The practical goal of this course is to familiarize students with the principles involved in each step of developing and delivering an expository message; from prayerfully looking to the Holy Spirit for the initial selection of a text, through the development of the main idea, preparing an outline and draft of the sermon, to the oral delivery of the message God is giving.

MT 509 – Missions and Evangelism

Missions and Evangelism offers a dual focus. It begins with a study of how the Great Commission (Matt. 28:16-20) to the Christian Church has been viewed and fulfilled throughout history. This course covers a broad sweep of missionary and evangelistic outreach in church history, from the Early Church to modern-day churches. For several weeks it focuses on missionary-eras and particularly on the life and work of specific missionaries and evangelists. The course concludes with a series of studies concerning the necessity for and practicalities of evangelism. Through these studies, students are guided to find their belief and expression in fulfilling the Great Commission in this day.

MT 510 – Divine Healing and Miracles

Divine Healing and Miracles will address the history, teachings and accounts, and application of divine healing and miracles found in the Scriptures. The student will explore the workings of these gifts throughout the history of the Church; and examine the purpose, motivation, and process for these divine gifts.

MT 511 – Principles of Spiritual Care

Principles of Spiritual Care provides a biblical Trinitarian foundation for Christian counseling and ministry. It explores the “why” behind the “what” and “how.” This course will explore how the understanding of God as a “being in relations” impacts spiritual care and ministry. This course will develop a theological basis for spiritual care.

MT 512 – Biblical Curriculum Development

Biblical Curriculum Development guides the student in planning a series of Bible studies and sermons. The student will study principles of effective teaching, including planning, preparation, and presentation. The course will present opportunities to prepare inductive and deductive study outlines. The student will learn how to identify the “big idea” of an individual study or series of lessons, and
how to develop content around that idea. For a series of lessons or sermons, the student will identify the topic, goal, objectives, and lesson outlines.

MT 513 – Practical Crisis Counseling

Practical Crisis Counseling will present some of the basic historical, theological, spiritual, and practical foundations for crisis counseling. The functional, pragmatic, and philosophical aspects of crisis counseling will be covered as well. This class will be focused on the practical application of learned principles and behavior in the participant’s unique situations. The goal is that students will gain real-life applications in the local church and other ministry settings.

MT 514 – Pastoral Counseling for Recovery and Restoration

Pastoral Counseling for Recovery and Restoration will introduce the student to pastoral support in the pursuit of recovery related to relation-based issues for individuals, relationships, and those coping with life’s challenges. We will begin to explore what it means to be created as persons in relationship and explore how dysfunction arises from several factors, including a lack of understanding, trauma, loss, pain, or self-medication. We will survey the symptoms of relational breakdowns as they present themselves in a variety of addictions, divorces, and family breakdowns. We will attempt to articulate what a healthy relationship entails, how it becomes dysfunctional, and explore the first steps towards
recovery and support. This course explores beyond the objective study of a subject. It will require self-reflection, empathetic engagement with other persons, and an honest and vulnerable investigation of what it means to understand yourself and others in the midst of challenging relationships.

*This course has a specific pre-enrollment requirement.

MT 526 – Christian Counseling Ethics

Christian Counseling Ethics provides a framework for the practice of Kingdom ethics in counseling from a biblical worldview. This course examines how to serve those in need of healing and spiritual care in a professional, ethical manner in the practice of counseling and spiritual care. Such knowledge is intended to promote a commitment to the ethical practice of ministry.

PL 501 – Foundations of Liturgy

Foundations of Liturgy will cover the practices of a church for public worship. The student will gain a comprehensive view of the scriptural principles involved in Christian liturgical practices historically and today. The course begins with a study of the New Testament Church gatherings. Using Old Testament examples and New Testament teaching, the student will proceed to analyze the basic
elements of church gatherings, as well as principles and keys for leading congregants in a service. The student will be provided with practical, Spirit-led guidelines. Students will be coached in simple applications of these principles. These topics are studied primarily via the lens of the Scriptures, the course textbooks, and readings from selected practitioners.

PL 505 – Relational Church Planting and Growth

Relational Church Planting and Growth examines the dynamics of church planting, development, and growth from a relational model which honors the biblical/theological foundations of the apostolic Church while learning to exegete the congregation, community, and culture in the context of the Lord’s kingdom mandate. Attention is given to relational-missional approaches of developing, sending, and serving which may assist in improving multi-generational connections between the life of the Church and its changing context.

PL 590 – Clinical Pastoral Education

Clinical Pastoral Education is the student participating in spiritual care through programs accredited by the Association of Clinical Pastoral Education. Emphasis is on the interpersonal relationships of the student under the supervision of certified chaplains. The program chosen will include lectures, interviews, readings, and case presentations, along with individual and group discussions led by chaplains, pastors, and guest lecturers. Taught at approved Association of Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) sites. An application needs to be made three months prior to the start of the unit. Some placement sites require a current background check. Additional fees for this course are payable by the student.

Total for the program – 72 Units

Units Needed

The Master of Divinity degree is a four-year program consisting of 72 units.

Graduation Requirements

To graduate with the Master of Divinity degree the student will:

  • Complete the minimum number of units required.
  • Successfully complete all courses in the degree program.
  • Earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
  • Fulfill any outstanding school financial obligations.

Student Testimonials

I am eternally grateful to God for providing Shiloh University. I could not find this level of education in the area of theology in my country. I always get excited when I am taking a new course and I always share the things I learn with my family, my friends, my church.”

Janneth Saveedra

Shiloh University has fanned the flame of my desire, and equipped me to share God’s hope and redemption with a needy world.” 

John Isoka

I have loved every bit of my experience with Shiloh University! The faculty provided a personal touch that is too often lost in other universities. The level of academics is top-notch and presented in a sound and meaningful way.”

Joshua Wheeler

Having instructors who could challenge me and question me on specific topics forced me to dig in and really understand the foundations of what I believe.”

Jeremy Richardson

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Shiloh University’s Ministry Programs aim to focus on leadership, compassionate ministry, and biblical studies.